Monday, October 6, 2014

MUSAIC—a collaborative digital initiative between the New World Symphony

MUSAIC—a collaborative digital initiative between the New World Symphony, Cleveland Institute of Music, Curtis Institute of Music, Eastman School of Music (University of Rochester), Guildhall School of Music and Drama (London), Manhattan School of Music, Royal Danish Academy of Music, San Francisco Conservatory of Music, University of Missouri-Kansas City, and University of Southern California—is an online community of classical musicians and continuously updated video library curated by America’s Orchestral Academy. Just as teachers have traditionally passed down knowledge to their students, MUSAIC provides access to classical music instruction and conversations for students and performers alike. Watch videos here!

Friday, October 3, 2014

A Mozart Mystery: Sonata Manuscript Surfaces in Budapest

For Balazs Mikusi, a young Hungarian musicologist, it was the find of a lifetime. Leafing through folders of unidentified manuscripts at the National Szechenyi Library in Budapest recently, he came across four pages of what looked to him like Mozart’s handwriting. As he read through the music, he told Agence France-Presse, he realized that he had stumbled onto Mozart’s own score of the Piano Sonata in A, K.331 – one of the best-known Mozart sonatas because of its “Rondo alla Turca” finale.
To verify his impression Mr. Mikusi showed a copy of the score to Ulrich Leisinger, the director of the Mozarteum Foundation in Salzburg, and Neal Zaslaw, the editor of the new Köchel catalog of Mozart’s works. Both agreed that the writing was Mozart’s, Mr. Mikusi said in an interview published in the library’s blog.  More

Man charged in $5M violin theft pleads guilty

Associated Press= MILWAUKEE (AP) — A man accused of masterminding the theft of a $5 million Stradivarius violin pleaded guilty to robbery on Friday, nearly eight months after the 300-year-old instrument was snatched from a musician who was attacked with a stun gun following a performance in Milwaukee.
Salah Salahadyn was taken into custody after changing his plea during a hearing in Milwaukee County Circuit Court. He could face as many as 10 years in prison when sentenced Nov. 10.
The instrument was missing for nine days before police found it, in good condition, in a suitcase at the Milwaukee home of Salahadyn's acquaintances. Police said the homeowner didn't know what was in the suitcase, which was found in the attic.   more

Friday, September 26, 2014

Naxos Music Library Mobile App Available!!!

Follow these steps, and start listening!

Need help? Contact Kathy Abromeit, Public Services Librarian, Conservatory Library

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Joshua Bell to Play Again in D.C. Metro Station after 2007 Stunt

The Grammy-winning violinist played for spare change in a D.C. Metro station during a 2007 experiment with The Washington Post, and almost no one paid attention. It made for a good magazine story that won the Pulitzer Prize. But Bell hasn't been able to live it down after seven years.
Now, Bell tells the Post he is planning another public performance in the main hall at Washington's Union Station. And he hopes to have an audience this time. The performance is set for Sept. 30 at 12:30 p.m.  More

British conductor Christopher Hogwood has died aged 73.

He died at his home in Cambridge following an illness lasting several months, a statement on his website said.
It added his funeral will be private, with a memorial service to be held at a later date.
Hogwood worked with many leading orchestras around the world and was considered one of the most influential exponents of the early-music movement.
The conductor founded the Academy of Ancient Music (AAM) in 1973 and directed the academy across six continents for some 30 years.
The AAM also made more than 200 CDs, including the first-ever complete cycle of Mozart symphonies on period instruments.
Among his most famous recordings include the 1980 version of Handel's Messiah with Emma Kirkby and James Bowman, which was named by BBC Music Magazine as one of the top 20 recordings of all time. more